Stratford bust and the Droeshout engraving
Read Online
Share

Stratford bust and the Droeshout engraving

  • 910 Want to read
  • ·
  • 67 Currently reading

Published by C. Palmer in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Portraits.,
  • Spielmann, Marion Harry, 1858-

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Sir George Greenwood.
GenrePortraits.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPR2929 .G7
The Physical Object
Pagination71, [1] p.
Number of Pages71
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6691931M
LC Control Number26014509
OCLC/WorldCa2115305

Download Stratford bust and the Droeshout engraving

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Duncan-Jones believes that the Stratford bust and the Droeshout engraving, however deficient in artistry, were based on sketches, drawings, and/or memories of people who knew Shakespeare. The Chandos portrait Duncan-Jones thinks is genuine too, painted Cited by: 2. Genre/Form: Portraits: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Greenwood, G.G. (Granville George), Sir, Stratford bust and the Droeshout engraving. By flipping through a single book that I happened to have on hand, S. Schoenbaum's Shakespeare: The Globe and the World (Folger Shakespeare Library, ), I have found a number of contemporary depictions of Queen Elizabeth that show a person with a sharper chin than appears in either the Stratford bust or the Droeshout print (Schoenbaum pp. Duncan-Jones believes that the Stratford bust and the Droeshout engraving, however deficient in artistry, were based on sketches, drawings, and/or memories of people who knew Shakespeare. The Chandos portrait Duncan-Jones thinks is genuine too, painted Reviews: 4.

Returning to the issue in with The Stratford Bust and The Droeshout Engraving, Greenwood noted the “vast amount of discussion and disputation” about the bust. He argued again that the Dugdale drawing, which he had seen by then, “is absolutely unlike the effigy as it exists today” (10).   The Droeshout engraving and Lewes Lewkenor. 26 Thursday Nov Posted by masteroftheceremonies in William Shakespeare The balding pate and rounded bush of hair above the ears bares some resemblance to the bust of the Stratford monument, so we may be sure we are looking at the same man, William Shakespeare, the actor. But the face in the. explain the discrepancy, but concluded: “It seems absolutely certain that this Stratford bust is in reality not the original bust at all,” adding that “the whole thing is changed” (Problem ). Returning to the issue in with The Stratford Bust and The Droeshout Engraving, Green-. The Droeshout portrait or Droeshout engraving is a portrait of William Shakespeare engraved by Martin Droeshout as the frontispiece for the title page of the First Folio collection of Shakespeare's plays, published in It is one of only two works of art definitively identifiable as a depiction of the poet; the other is the statue erected as his funeral monument in Shakespeare's home town.

Duncan-Jones provides a detailed critique of three of the most widely accepted portraits: the engraving facing the First Folio’s title page; the sculptured stone bust that adorns Shakespeare’s funerary monument at Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon; and the “Chandos portrait,” an early seventeenth-century painting on canvas which.   Apart from the Droeshout woodcut and the Stratford bust, there are no portraits which can be definitively identified as representing William Shakespeare. Even the Chandos painting, the very first picture acquired by the National Portrait Gallery, is only assumed to be of him because it represents a man who looks very much like our much-loved. Duncan-Jones believes that the Stratford bust and the Droeshout engraving, however deficient in artistry, were based on sketches, drawings, and/or memories of people who knew Shakespeare. The Chandos portrait Duncan-Jones thinks is genuine too, painted .   New events keep unfolding in this Big Year for Edward de Vere! Here's the new bronze bust to replace the traditional image, you know, the Engraving in the First Folio and/or the Bust in the Stratford church. It was commissioned by a fellow named Ben August of Houston, a Shakespeare-lover who learned about.